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German POW Camps

Coverage of the following POW camps was found on a search of available imagery:

• STALAG X-D (310) and OFLAG 83, Wietzendorf, Germany
• STALAG III-C Alt Drewitz / Küstrin, Germany
• STALAG II-D, Stargard, Poland
• OFLAG II-D & STALAG 302, Borne, Poland
• OFLAG VI-B, Dossel, Germany
• STALAG 326, Senne-Stukenbrock, Germany
• STALAG 319, Chelm, Poland
• STALAG 381, Tapa, Estonia
• Jekabpils, Latvia

STALAG X-D (310) and OFLAG 83, Wietzendorf, Germany

STALAG X-D (310) at Wietzendorf was one of three set up on the Lüneburg Heath in1941 for Red Army POWs. Thousands of Soviet POWs were held in the camps where they lived in dugout shelters. Many died of exposure and malnutrition. The camp was in use between July 1941 and August 1942, when it became a branch camp of STALAG XI-B at Oerbke/Bad Fallingbostel, which held mainly British POWs. In January 1944, the camp became OFLAG 83, housing Italian officers.

By September 1944 the remnants of the dugout shelters could still be seen in a large open area that comprised part of STALAG X-D (Graphics 1 & 2). About one-third of the camp had been taken over by OFLAG 83, which consisted of two areas with a total of 16 barracks and two kitchens (Graphic 1). A burial site for Soviet POWs was 1 km northeast of the camp (Graphic 3).

By September 1944 the remnants of the dugout shelters could still be seen in a large open area that comprised part of STALAG X-D (Graphics 1 & 2).  About one-third of the camp had been taken over by OFLAG 83, which consisted of two areas with a total of 16 barracks and two kitchens (Graphic 1).  A burial site for Soviet POWs was 1 km northeast of the camp (Graphic 3).
By September 1944 the remnants of the dugout shelters could still be seen in a large open area that comprised part of STALAG X-D (Graphics 1 & 2).  About one-third of the camp had been taken over by OFLAG 83, which consisted of two areas with a total of 16 barracks and two kitchens (Graphic 1).  A burial site for Soviet POWs was 1 km northeast of the camp (Graphic 3).
By September 1944 the remnants of the dugout shelters could still be seen in a large open area that comprised part of STALAG X-D (Graphics 1 & 2).  About one-third of the camp had been taken over by OFLAG 83, which consisted of two areas with a total of 16 barracks and two kitchens (Graphic 1).  A burial site for Soviet POWs was 1 km northeast of the camp (Graphic 3).

STALAG III-C Alt Drewitz / Küstrin

Stalag III-C, at Alt Drewitz near the fortress of Küstrin was established in June 1940 to hold Belgian and French POWs, but eventually Yugoslav, British, Soviet, Italian and American prisoners were housed there. When imaged on 20 February 1945, the camp was vacant, having been liberated by the Red Army on 31 January (Graphic).

Stalag III-C, at Alt Drewitz near the fortress of Küstrin was established in June 1940 to hold Belgian and French POWs, but eventually Yugoslav, British, Soviet, Italian and American prisoners were housed there.  When imaged on 20 February 1945, the camp was vacant, having been liberated by the Red Army on 31 January (Graphic).

STALAG XII-A, Limburg an der Lahn, Germany

STALAG XII-A, imaged on 26 September 1944, was mainly operated as a POW transit camp; from there POWs were sent to other camps around the Reich. Before it was liberated in March 1945, STALAG XII-A held prisoners from many nationalities including Americans, British, Asian and African.

Stalag III-C, at Alt Drewitz near the fortress of Küstrin was established in June 1940 to hold Belgian and French POWs, but eventually Yugoslav, British, Soviet, Italian and American prisoners were housed there.  When imaged on 20 February 1945, the camp was vacant, having been liberated by the Red Army on 31 January (Graphic).

STALAG II-D, Stargard, Poland

STALAG II-D at Stargard, Pomerania (Poland) was partially imaged by and RAF reconnaissance sortie on 23 June 1943. According to available information the camp was established for Polish prisoners in September 1939. Between 1940 and 1944, French, Soviet, American, Canadian and Italian POWs were interred in the camp. After the war a military barracks was constructed at the site.

Overall view of STALAG II-D, Stargard/Klutzow, Poland

OFLAG II-D & STALAG 302, Borne, Poland

On 24 August 1944, two prisoner of war camps, OFLAG II-D and STALAG 302, were imaged in the vicinity of two Wehrmacht garrisons at what is now Borne-Sulinowo, (Gross Born) Poland. OFLAG II-D, near the town of Rederitz (present day Nadarzyce first held Polish officers, then French officers (1940) and once again, Polish officers (1942). It is not clear when STALAG 302 was constructed. Another camp, STALAG 323, at nearby Barkenbrugge was built for Soviet POWs but was not imaged.

On 24 August 1944, two prisoner of war camps, OFLAG II-D and STALAG 302, were imaged in the vicinity of two Wehrmacht garrisons at what is now Borne-Sulinowo, (Gross Born) Poland.   OFLAG II-D, near the town of Rederitz (present day Nadarzyce first held Polish officers, then French officers (1940) and once again, Polish officers (1942). It is not clear when STALAG 302 was constructed. Another camp, STALAG 323, at nearby Barkenbrugge was built for Soviet POWs but was not imaged.

OFLAG VI-B, Dossel, Germany

OFLAG VI-B was opened in September 1940 to house French and then British officers. In September 1942 the British prisoners were transferred to other camps and replaced by Polish officers. The camp was the site of a number of escape attempts. On 27 September 1944, a British aircraft accidently bombed the camp, killing 90 prisoners.

OFLAG VI-B was opened in September 1940 to house French and then British officers. In September 1942 the British prisoners were transferred to other camps and replaced by Polish officers. The camp was the site of a number of escape attempts. On 27 September 1944, a British aircraft accidently bombed the camp, killing 90 prisoners.

STALAG 326, Senne-Stukenbrock, Germany

STALAG 326 (VI-K) was established in early 1941 to house Soviet prisoners. Located north of Paderborn, the camp was one of the largest in Germany, furnishing labor for nearby industries throughout the war. The image shows the camp on 15 March 1945, shortly before liberation by the American 117th Infantry Regiment on 2 April.

Coverage of the following POW camps was found on a search of available imagery: 

•	STALAG X-D (310) and OFLAG 83, Wietzendorf, Germany 
•	STALAG III-C Alt Drewitz / Küstrin, Germany  
•	STALAG II-D, Stargard, Poland
•	OFLAG II-D & STALAG 302, Borne, Poland
•	OFLAG VI-B, Dossel, Germany
•	STALAG 326, Senne-Stukenbrock, Germany
•	STALAG 319, Chelm, Poland
•	STALAG 381, Tapa, Estonia
•	Jekabpils, Latvia

STALAG 319 at Chelm, Poland

STALAG 319 at Chelm is shown after it was liberated by the Soviets in early 1944. The first camp, STALAG 319A was established in July 1941 for Soviet prisoners and two other sections were added later. STALAG 319A was the largest of the three sections with conventional barracks organized into several groups. Housing in the adjacent STALAG 319C consisted of dugouts. After the war began large numbers of Russian prisoners were murdered and buried in the Borek Forest southeast of the town. The September 1944 coverage shows numerous clearings for possible mass graves.

STALAG 319 at Chelm is shown after it was liberated by the Soviets in early 1944. The first camp, STALAG 319A was established in July 1941 for Soviet prisoners and two other sections were added later.  STALAG 319A was the largest of the three sections with conventional barracks organized into several groups. Housing in the adjacent STALAG 319C consisted of dugouts. After the war began large numbers of Russian prisoners were murdered and buried in the Borek Forest southeast of the town. The September 1944 coverage shows numerous clearings for possible mass graves.
STALAG 319 at Chelm is shown after it was liberated by the Soviets in early 1944. The first camp, STALAG 319A was established in July 1941 for Soviet prisoners and two other sections were added later.  STALAG 319A was the largest of the three sections with conventional barracks organized into several groups. Housing in the adjacent STALAG 319C consisted of dugouts. After the war began large numbers of Russian prisoners were murdered and buried in the Borek Forest southeast of the town. The September 1944 coverage shows numerous clearings for possible mass graves.

STALAG 381 at Tapa, Estonia

Not much is known about STALAG 381. According to Wikipedia the facility was set up for Soviet POWs and operated between October 1941 to May 1943. On 21 October 1944, the camp appeared to be intact.

Not much is known about STALAG 381. According to Wikipedia the facility was set up for Soviet POWs and operated between October 1941 to May 1943.  On 21 October 1944, the camp appeared to be intact.

POW or Labor Camp at Jekabpils, Latvia

A POW or labor camp was located south of Jekabpils (Jakobstadt) in eastern Latvia (Graphic 1). By September 1944 the camp, located near a former Luftwaffe Airfield had been abandoned. The fence-secured camp consisted of about 55 possible dugout shelters, an assembly area and a separate dismantled possible guard’s barracks. Several prepared bomb shelters had been excavated outside the camp entrance.

A POW or labor camp was located south of Jekabpils (Jakobstadt) in eastern Latvia (Graphic 1).  By September 1944 the camp, located near a former Luftwaffe Airfield had been abandoned. The fence-secured camp consisted of about 55 possible dugout shelters, an assembly area and a separate dismantled possible guard’s barracks. Several prepared bomb shelters had been excavated outside the camp entrance.

Possible POW or Labor Camp at Jelgava, Latvia

In early August 1944, a Luftwaffe reconnaissance sortie covered the town of Jelgava (Mitau) Latvia, revealing the remains of a POW or labor camp. This camp may have been a subcamp of STALAG 350 at Salaspils, near Riga but also possibly supported an adjacent to a sawmill and an unidentified industry. Eight buildings in the secured section had been razed, but several others including those in a possible guard barracks were intact.

By September 1944 the remnants of the dugout shelters could still be seen in a large open area that comprised part of STALAG X-D (Graphics 1 & 2).  About one-third of the camp had been taken over by OFLAG 83, which consisted of two areas with a total of 16 barracks and two kitchens (Graphic 1).  A burial site for Soviet POWs was 1 km northeast of the camp (Graphic 3).
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