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Latvia POW & Labor Camps

Analysis of Luftwaffe imagery has revealed two possible German POW or labor camps in Latvia, one at Jekabpils (Jakobstadt) and another at Jelgava. Neither of these sites appears in the record of labor camps in Latvia -- most of which were concentration camps or subcamps in the Riga area {Map). The known POW camps were STALAG 350 at Riga and a subcamp, STALAG 350Z at Salaspils

The Jekbapils camp was located near a former Luftwaffe airfield and bore resemblance to several concentration and POW camps (Graphic 1). By September 1944 the camp had been abandoned, but the fence-secured compound with about 55 dugout shelters, an assembly area and a separate dismantled guard's barracks could still be seen. Several prepared bomb shelters had been excavated outside the camp entrance.

The Jekbapils camp was located near a former Luftwaffe airfield and bore resemblance to several concentration and POW camps (Graphic 1).  By September 1944 the camp had been abandoned, but the fence-secured compound with about 55 dugout shelters, an assembly area and a separate dismantled guard's barracks could still be seen.  Several prepared bomb shelters had been excavated outside the camp entrance.

The Soviets had occupied the airfield (Graphic 2). Despite an attempted demolition of the field by the Wehrmacht, 86 Soviet aircraft were present; parking revetments had also been constructed and the field was defended by several anti-aircraft (AAA) sites.

The Soviets had occupied the airfield (Graphic 2).  Despite an attempted demolition of the field by the Wehrmacht, 86 Soviet aircraft were present; parking revetments had also been constructed and the field was defended by several anti-aircraft (AAA) sites.

The possible labor camp at Jelgava resembled other camps with more permanent facilities (Graphic 3). The camp was adjacent to a sawmill and an unidentified industry. In August 1944 eight barracks in the secured section had been razed, but several others including those in a possible guard barracks were intact.

The possible labor camp at Jelgava resembled other camps with more permanent facilities (Graphic 3).  The camp was adjacent to a sawmill and an unidentified industry. In August 1944 eight barracks in the secured section had been razed, but several others including those in a possible guard barracks were intact.
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