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Concentration Camps & Sub-Camps

Coverage of the following concentration camps was found on a search of available imagery:
• Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp & Sub-camps
• Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp
• Dachau Concentration Camp, May 1945
• Pustkow Concentration, Labor and POW Camps, Poland
• Szebnie Concentration, Labor and POW Camp, Poland
• Brieg-Pampitz Concentration Camp, Brzeg, Poland (Gross Rosen)
• Lärz -Retzow Concentration Camp (Ravensbruck)
• Herzogenbusch-Vught Concentration Camp, Netherlands
• Hannover-Stöcken Concentration Camp (Neuengamme)

Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp & Sub-Camps

Sachsenhausen was one of the first Nazi concentration camps and was a model for future construction. The camp also held the administrative headquarters of SS-Concentration Camp System and was the home garrison of 3rd SS Panzer Division ‘Totenkopf.’ Coverage from 20 May 1943 showed the camp’s component parts: the Original Camp (1936), Small Camp (1938), Workshop annex (1939), Special Camp (1941-1942), the execution Area, ‘Station- Z’ (1942-1943) (Graphic 1).

Sachsenhausen was one of the first Nazi concentration camps and was a model for future construction. The camp also held the administrative headquarters of SS-Concentration Camp System and was the home garrison of 3rd SS Panzer Division ‘Totenkopf.’ Coverage from 20 May 1943 showed the camp’s component parts: the Original Camp (1936), Small Camp (1938), Workshop annex (1939), Special Camp (1941-1942), the execution Area, ‘Station- Z’ (1942-1943) (Graphic 1).

The gas chamber in Station-Z was complete but the crematory’s stack was not yet been added. (Graphic 2). A comparison between May 1943 and May 1944 shows how the Special Camp that housed POWs and special prisoners was expanded (Graphic 3). A very high level of activity in the vehicle park of the SS Barracks was probably related to mobilization seen at close by Oranienburg training area (see article on SS mobilization; Graphic 4)

The gas chamber in Station-Z was complete but the crematory’s stack was not yet been added. (Graphic 2).  A comparison between May 1943 and May 1944 shows how the Special Camp that housed POWs and special prisoners was expanded (Graphic 3).  A very high level of activity in the vehicle park of the SS Barracks was probably related to mobilization seen at close by Oranienburg training area (see article on SS mobilization; Graphic 4)
The gas chamber in Station-Z was complete but the crematory’s stack was not yet been added. (Graphic 2).  A comparison between May 1943 and May 1944 shows how the Special Camp that housed POWs and special prisoners was expanded (Graphic 3).  A very high level of activity in the vehicle park of the SS Barracks was probably related to mobilization seen at close by Oranienburg training area (see article on SS mobilization; Graphic 4)

Sachsenhausen had a number of satellite camps. One of them supported a brick works northeast of the camp across the Oder-Havel Canal (Graphic 5). Another sub-camp was identified at Glöwen, a small town 80 km west-northwest of Oranienburg (Graphic 6). The camp supported a munitions production and storage complex near the town of Nitzow known as "Dynamit-AG.’ On 16 March 1945 the camp had two barracks areas, one of which had been removed.

Sachsenhausen had a number of satellite camps. One of them supported a brick works northeast of the camp across the Oder-Havel Canal (Graphic 5).  Another sub-camp was identified at Glöwen, a small town 80 km west-northwest of Oranienburg (Graphic 6).  The camp supported a munitions production and storage complex near the town of Nitzow known as "Dynamit-AG.’  On 16 March 1945 the camp had two barracks areas, one of which had been removed.
Sachsenhausen had a number of satellite camps. One of them supported a brick works northeast of the camp across the Oder-Havel Canal (Graphic 5).  Another sub-camp was identified at Glöwen, a small town 80 km west-northwest of Oranienburg (Graphic 6).  The camp supported a munitions production and storage complex near the town of Nitzow known as "Dynamit-AG.’  On 16 March 1945 the camp had two barracks areas, one of which had been removed.

Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp

Coverage of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp on 14 September 1944 revealed prisoner assemblies in at least two areas (Graphic 1). The largest group could be seen in the so-called "Star Camp" in a quadrangle used for daily roll-calls. Another assembly in the women’s "Tent Camp" was in front of a large tent that had been erected since the previous day. Another possible prisoner assembly was in the "Neutral's Camp."

Sachsenhausen was one of the first Nazi concentration camps and was a model for future construction. The camp also held the administrative headquarters of SS-Concentration Camp System and was the home garrison of 3rd SS Panzer Division ‘Totenkopf.’ Coverage from 20 May 1943 showed the camp’s component parts: the Original Camp (1936), Small Camp (1938), Workshop annex (1939), Special Camp (1941-1942), the execution Area, ‘Station- Z’ (1942-1943) (Graphic 1).

Coverage from 24 April 1945 showed Bergen-Belsen soon after liberation by British troops a week earlier (Graphic 2). Some barracks at the southwest end of the camp had already been razed and tents had been removed from the Women’s Camp. Numerous vehicles could be seen around the area.

Bergen-Belsen shortly after liberation in April 1945

Dachau Concentration Camp after Liberation, May 1945

Dachau concentration camp was liberated on 29 April 1945 and these images taken between 7 and 12 May show how quickly the camp was cleaned-up and evacuated. Elements of the U.S. Army Medical Corps had arrived. The camp was still occupied with some people living in outside shelters (Graphic 1).

Dachau concentration camp was liberated on 29 April 1945 and these images taken between 7 and 12 May show how quickly the camp was cleaned-up and evacuated.  Elements of the U.S. Army Medical Corps had arrived.  The camp was still occupied with some people living in outside shelters (Graphic 1).

Camp debris was being burned on the former SS Barracks athletic field and inside the installation and U.S. Army vehicles were being washed-down (Graphic 2 &3). By 27 May the camp had been completely vacated (Graphic 4).

Camp debris was being burned on the former SS Barracks athletic field and inside the installation and U.S. Army vehicles were being washed-down (Graphic 2 &3).  By 27 May the camp had been completely vacated (Graphic 4).
Camp debris was being burned on the former SS Barracks athletic field and inside the installation and U.S. Army vehicles were being washed-down (Graphic 2 &3).  By 27 May the camp had been completely vacated (Graphic 4).
Camp debris was being burned on the former SS Barracks athletic field and inside the installation and U.S. Army vehicles were being washed-down (Graphic 2 &3).  By 27 May the camp had been completely vacated (Graphic 4).

Pustkow SS Concentration & Labor Camp, Poland

In 1940, the SS set up a concentration camp at Pustkow, in southeast Poland. The camp was occupied by Jews from ghettos in the surrounding area and supported construction of a large training complex, SS-Truppenübungsplatz Heidelager (Graphic 1). After the Heidelager was completed, the prisoners were put to work at the nearby V-2 Test Facility at Blizna (see separate article).

In 1940, the SS set up a concentration camp at Pustkow, in southeast Poland. The camp was occupied by Jews from ghettos in the surrounding area and supported construction of a large training complex, SS-Truppenübungsplatz Heidelager (Graphic 1).  After the Heidelager was completed, the prisoners were put to work at the nearby V-2 Test Facility at Blizna (see separate article).

The first Pustkow camp was situated next to the Heidelager railhead (Graphic 1). In 1942 the camp was closed and the Jewish prisoners relocated to a new camp that was already occupied by Polish prisoners (Graphic 2).

The gas chamber in Station-Z was complete but the crematory’s stack was not yet been added. (Graphic 2).  A comparison between May 1943 and May 1944 shows how the Special Camp that housed POWs and special prisoners was expanded (Graphic 3).  A very high level of activity in the vehicle park of the SS Barracks was probably related to mobilization seen at close by Oranienburg training area (see article on SS mobilization; Graphic 4)

A separate POW camp for more than 5000 Soviet prisoners was opened in 1941. This camp, which reportedly did not have buildings for the prisoners, was most likely immediately northeast of the new camps and northwest of a hill that became known as the Góra Śmierci ('Hill of Death'; Graphics 3 & 4). The hill was used for executions and cremation of the Soviet prisoners; related structures and features can still be seen near the at the present-day camp memorial (Graphic 5).

A separate POW camp for more than 5000 Soviet prisoners was opened in 1941. This camp, which reportedly did not have buildings for the prisoners, was most likely immediately northeast of the new camps and northwest of a hill that became known as the Góra Śmierci ('Hill of Death'; Graphics 3 & 4).  The hill was used for executions and cremation of the Soviet prisoners; related structures and features can still be seen near the at the present-day camp memorial (Graphic 5).
A separate POW camp for more than 5000 Soviet prisoners was opened in 1941. This camp, which reportedly did not have buildings for the prisoners, was most likely immediately northeast of the new camps and northwest of a hill that became known as the Góra Śmierci ('Hill of Death'; Graphics 3 & 4).  The hill was used for executions and cremation of the Soviet prisoners; related structures and features can still be seen near the at the present-day camp memorial (Graphic 5).
A separate POW camp for more than 5000 Soviet prisoners was opened in 1941. This camp, which reportedly did not have buildings for the prisoners, was most likely immediately northeast of the new camps and northwest of a hill that became known as the Góra Śmierci ('Hill of Death'; Graphics 3 & 4).  The hill was used for executions and cremation of the Soviet prisoners; related structures and features can still be seen near the at the present-day camp memorial (Graphic 5).

The Heidelager was occupied by the Red Army in July 1944. By the time the Góra Śmierci was covered by Luftwaffe reconnaissance on 16 October 1944 the Nazis had attempted to clean up the POW camp area and remove traces of execution and cremation from the hill (Graphic 6).

The Heidelager was occupied by the Red Army in July 1944. By the time the Góra Śmierci was covered by Luftwaffe reconnaissance on 16 October 1944 the Nazis had attempted to clean up the POW camp area and remove traces of execution and cremation from the hill (Graphic 6).

Szebnie POW & Concentration Camp, Poland

A camp at Szebnie in southeast Poland was set up in 1941 as a STALAG to house Soviet prisoners. By early 1943 it became a concentration camp for Poles, Jews and Gypsies. In August 1943 the Jews were separated in the north part of the camp and eventually sent to Auszchwitz. The camp was abandoned in September 1944. Coverage of the camp from 15 April 1944 reflects changes shown on an available sketch from 1943 when Jewish prisoners were relocated to new barracks within the camp (Graphic)

A camp at Szebnie in southeast Poland was set up in 1941 as a STALAG to house Soviet prisoners. By early 1943 it became a concentration camp for Poles, Jews and Gypsies.  In August 1943 the Jews were separated in the north part of the camp and eventually sent to Auszchwitz. The camp was abandoned in September 1944. Coverage of the camp from 15 April 1944 reflects changes shown on an available sketch from 1943 when Jewish prisoners were relocated to new barracks within the camp (Graphic)

Brieg-Pampitz Concentration Camp, Brzeg, Poland (Gross Rosen)

A sub-camp of the Gross Rosen concentration camp was located near the Lufwaffe base at Brzeg (Brieg), Poland. The camp, outside the village of Pampitz (Pepice), had more than 60 dugout huts surrounded by security fences and guard towers. The camp supported runway lengthening at the airfield. This was a major effort, requiring a narrow-gage construction rail network that served most of the construction sites (Graphic).

A sub-camp of the Gross Rosen concentration camp was located near the Lufwaffe base at Brzeg (Brieg), Poland. The camp, outside the village of Pampitz (Pepice), had more than 60 dugout huts surrounded by security fences and guard towers. The camp supported runway lengthening at the airfield. This was a major effort, requiring a narrow-gage construction rail network that served most of the construction sites (Graphic).

Lärz-Retzow Concentration Camp (Ravensbruck)

On 11 April 1945 people could be still be seen in a sub-camp of Ravensbruck at Lärz (Retzow). The camp supported construction of the nearby airfield, which was part of the Rechlin test facility and was built for jet aircraft. Notably, the camp had two separately-secured sections; one was enclosed by a double-security fence, while the other, with only a single fence appeared to have been more recently added.

On 11 April 1945 people could be still be seen in a sub-camp of Ravensbruck at Lärz (Retzow). The camp supported construction of the nearby airfield, which was part of the Rechlin test facility and was built for jet aircraft.  Notably, the camp had two separately-secured sections; one was enclosed by a double-security fence, while the other, with only a single fence appeared to have been more recently added.

Herzogenbusch-Vught Concentration Camp, Netherlands

Coverage from September 1944 shows the Herzogenbusch-Vught Concentration camp, which was built in 1942 to relieve crowding at others at Westerbork and Amersfoort. The first prisoners arrived at the camp in January; it was liberated by British troops in October 1944.

Overall view of Hertogenbosch-Vught Concentrations camp, Netherlands

Hannover-Stöcken Concentration Camp (Neuengamme)

A subcamp of the Neuengamme Concentration camp was set up in July 1943 to support an existing factory that produced for U-boats batteries. Coverage from April 1945 shows the camp and factory plus another labor camp under construction nearby.

A subcamp of the Neuengamme Concentration camp was set up in July 1943 to support an existing factory that produced for U-boats batteries. Coverage from April 1945 shows the camp and factory plus another labor camp under construction nearby.
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